The GOP & Hispanics

When (not if, but when) Rick Perry declares his candidacy for President, he will try to run on his jobs record. He will position himself as the state executive who created more jobs in his state than any other governor. His record will be indisputable in terms of numbers. It’s only when you look closer at how those jobs were created, and under what conditions, that the entire argument falls apart.

t’s easy to be charmed by Texas, but it would be a mistake to think the state might serve as a national model. Texas created almost 250,000 jobs in the past two years, nearly as many as the other 49 states combined. Texas leaders, including Republican Governor Rick Perry, credit that success to low taxes and a business-friendly regulatory approach.

Yes and no. Those factors played a role. To a sizable degree, however, the state’s booming payrolls are the result of hard-to-duplicate factors, such as a fast-growing population, and unusually low wages.

Two Republican boosters have circulated a memo urging business owners to call or email lawmakers on the powerful House Committee on State Affairs to encourage them to vote against the “sanctuary cities” bills pending before the committee.

Norman Adams, the co-founder of Texans for Sensible Immigration Policy and a member ofTexas GOP Vote, a conservative website, andDr. Steve Hotze, the chairman of Conservative Republicans of Texas, are urging a “no” vote on HB9 and SB9, which they say “can only serve political purposes.”

 

Texas Gov. Rick Perry made no mention of the federal government’s overreach or the violence he says is spilling across the state’s border during a brief and tense public appearance today before hundreds of Latino elected officials. And he certainly didn’t mention whether he’s running for president. 

Instead, Perry, who spoke for fewer than 13 minutes during the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials annual conference, touted job growth and his appointment of Hispanic statewide officials to a crowd that received him with, at best, a lukewarm response.

Two Republican boosters have circulated a memo urging business owners to call or email lawmakers on the powerful House Committee on State Affairs to encourage them to vote against the “sanctuary cities” bills pending before the committee.

The Immigration and Customs Enforcement agency expects to deport about 400,000 people this fiscal year, nearly 10 percent above the Bush administration’s 2008 total and 25 percent more than were deported in 2007. The pace of company audits has roughly quadrupled since President George W. Bush's final year in office.

The effort is part of President Obama's larger project “to make our national laws actually work,” as he put it in a speech this month at American University. Partly designed to entice Republicans to support comprehensive immigration reform, the mission is proving difficult and politically perilous.

The great communicator Ronald Reagan once said, “Hispanics are Republican they just don’t know it.” 

The nation’s largest Protestant denomination, the Southern Baptist Convention approved a resolution backing a path to legal status for illegal immigrants at its annual meeting in Phoenix.

The resolution calls on the government to make border security a priority and to hold businesses accountable for their hiring. It also asks government officials to support “a just and compassionate path to legal status, with appropriate restitutionary measures, for those undocumented immigrants already living in our country.” The vision for a path toward legal status mirrors what President Barack Obama has offered as he’s urged support for immigration reform.



Read more: http://www.politico.com/news/stories/0611/57196.html#ixzz1PYdomB93

Tea Party leader says, “Too many hispanics in Texas Legislature.”